1912 Dress #4016 Summary! 11

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This dress was fun and I recommend making it! I made it so Kate Brown,  our Secretary of State (VoteOregon!) would have a costume to wear ( my earlier 1912 one) in the Portland Grand Floral Parade, to celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Oregon Women Voting! Go Suffragettes! I finished the dress and hat in time and walked with pals. Our group included the League of Women Voters, Oregon Women’s Commission, and some others. See the 1911 car carrying Oregon Suffragette Abigail Scott Duniway’s great grand daughters. They told me that she wasn’t really the first Oregon woman to vote, that was Sacagawea, sorry I don’t really know.

Go Portland Mayer Sam Adams! Yes, that is the real Mayor in the picture, though he does play the Mayor’s Aide in Portlandia. The Rodeo horse shook it’s head and snorted at my costume- no pockets, no apples or carrots! No wonder people watched for the Wells Fargo coaches1 Amazingly pretty!

The pattern came without instructions and here is a review of my posts, with a summary of the 1912 Project notes at the end.

  1. Getting bearings on the dress and pattern!
  2. Pattern measurements
  3. Making the Very Pretty Collar 🙂
  4. Pattern fitting (continued! 🙂 )
  5. Bodice fitting
  6. Fitting and shaping the skirt seams
  7. Inserting sleeve/bodice gussets
  8. The cuffs
  9. Sewing the bias bands
  10. Sewing the front panel
  11. Making a neck facing
  12. Finishing- odds & ends

VPLL Check List:

Blog points, so I can ask for more patterns!  A possible  total 25 per pattern, here’s my check list:

  • blog – a dozen posts!
  • pattern without instructions. Right, none on this one.
  • photos– max 5, plenty of photos, 20? on this summary alone.
  • fit description. This dress is high & narrow waisted, with a fitted, long skirt and inset front panel. Sleeves are elbow length with faced cuffs. The bodice is pigeon-chested.
  • alteration descriptions. I widened the bust, hips, and waist. I shortened the sleeves a bit, moved the shoulder seam for my dropped shoulders.
  • pattern change descriptions. The front panel sections differed by including/not including a 3/8″ seam allowance and they needed to be matched. I only had room for two bodice bias bands. I drafted a neck facing. If I were to make this again, I would move the bodice gathering section closer to the center chest. Offsetting it by the width of the facing fold pushed it too far off to the sides. There was no provision included for the contrast band at the hem.
  • instruction change list. There was no instruction list. I described my sewing order in the blog posts.
  • finished garment description. This long, fitted dress is completed in Pendleton wools, both light weight gabardines, a cream solid and a cream/beige mini-hounds-tooth. A solid cream fabric is used for a center front inset panel and to line the cuffs. There is a wide hem band, underarm gussets and a self-fabric belt. Bias bands on the cuffs and front are accented with covered buttons. The embroidered collar was made with a cotton gabardine over a piped undercollar. Front closure is under the left side of the panel, with snaps, hooks and eyes sewn onto cotton twill tape. A self-belt was made to match.
  • description of technique (lace, cut work etc.). Detailed descriptions are included for making the underarm gussets, the Broderie Anglaise collar work, cuff facing, bodice panel lining etc.
  • sewing skill used/needed, why. Very good skills are needed for fitting the the one-piece (no longer usual) bodice, drafting pattern pieces, fitting the components of the dress closely, to be flattering. There are plenty of tricky bits, the gussets, sewing the bias bands with appropriate ease, stabilizing bias edges.

[this is a separate checklist, including just in case 🙂 ] review checklist included at end.

description– see pattern & finished garment description above.
pattern sizing– this was a small dress, hoo-boy, those hips were TINY! The skirt 0162 I made last was billed as a 25″ waist but seemed bigger, so I assumed it accommodated numerous undergarments. This dress doesn’t. Someone guessed it was designed for young women. Since pattern numbers have jumped all over the place since 1912 and have been inconsistent from one source to another, I’d say this was designed for a women ~5’2″, weighing not much more than 110 pounds.
look like photo? Yes, aside from the fact that the sketch is considerably stretched for fashion interpretation. 🙂
instructions easy? No instructions and some would have been helpful. I researched for making gussets and learning Broderie Anglaise, cited in posts.
what to like/dislike? I don’t really like the front closure, don’t feel confident with snaps, hooks and eyes. I would change the neck fitting for a re-make. The gussets were a very positive feature and I really liked the collar, so pretty! It looks like one in a current Vogue ad for Louis Vuitton spring suits. I wore a slip reaching mid-shin and really needed one as long as the dress for walking in a stiff breeze with knitting stockings.
fabric used– Pendleton gabardine wools, light weight, and a cotton gabardine for the embroidered collar. I loved working with the wool, it drapes spectacularly.
alterations/design changes? see above.
recommend to others? If you don’t need historic accuracy, consider using a zipper closure. Practice making a gusset with waste fabric beforehand. Think carefully about the cuff seams- I got them backwards. They are counter intuitive.  Place the bodice gatherscloser to the middle. Fit carefully- I was struck by how frumpy my initial muslin version looked.
conclusion? This dress has charm and great style details. I love it!
Pattern Name: E4016_DRESS. 
sewer’s skill:Advanced.
rating & why, 1-5, 1-Not a Fan, 2 – So-So, 3 – Good/Average, 4-Better than Average, 5-I LOVED IT! and why?
skill needed & why. I loved this dress. It was fun to wear, got scads of compliments. It was a challenge for me, a sewer who is likely to make errors. 🙂 I learned lots!
instructions easy? Change? [no instructions]
Fit/sizing? As expected? The pattern size wasn’t listed, so I was prepared to alter and check all areas. It was actually smaller than I expected though.
Alterations? For fit or design? I flared the skirt, all three pattern sections, back, side and front panel. I inserted darts in the skirt front and tucks in the bodice back.
volunteer for more… sorry, very little spare time, not really any with this added to the plate. 🙂

Finishing the dress, wrapping up! 5

The dress is done and I wore it!

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The finishing touches:

  • The collar pattern was re-drafted to include an overlap, then cut into two pieces to accommodate more straight-of-grain. Fussy cutting was still a little off, oh well.
  • The outer blouse collar facing was whipped into place.
  • The front edges were rolled, amazingly easier than with silk!!
  • One last look at the lining, seems such a waste to cover up that spectacular Liberty lawn!
  • Wrapping the bodice was an exercise in faith. I turned the lining and sort-of sewed it to the outer blouse, which ended below it. I serged the outer layer edge. They didn’t match and looked pretty crummy. I sewed a large snap to the middle back, wrapped the rest and tucked it in. This would need some work for a repeat version. The outer blouse would need to be longer to sew it to the lining at the lower edge, but then the gathering lines would show–tear them out? hmm…the belt covered it.

Skirt #0162 finished! 2

Last finishing bits:

The Hem:
I wanted a little more body so I sewed in horse hair, then covered it with a sheer ribbon, in case I start kicking up my heels. 🙂 This would have been so much easier with black horse hair, but I didn’t find any…

 

The Placket:
It needed reinforcing but I didn’t want more bulk, so I used a black cotton twill tape.  The waist band looked better when I took the elastic off and refitted it, pretty bulky though, with the twill tape! In an earlier blog, a pucker showed on the placket, so I took it apart and restitched it.

Buttons:
I like the buttons. What I would do differently? Those back buttons should hit higher on me, just at the knee, and they are lower. Next time! If you are fitting, I’d choose where that pleat starts and move it, if you need to!
But the skirt is done, ready for this Saturday, an Oregon Suffragette! Watch for finishing the shirtwaist & hat…

Finding Fabric… 1

Fabric Shopping in Florence

Now that 1912  patterns are arriving,
fabric comes to mind!

We lost our beloved
Independent 
 
home town
“27th St. Fabrics” recently, so travel or mail order for me! Here’s my list,
some because I want to go someday :

I want good sources for Linen & Heirloom supplies. Capitol Imports is wholesale only, sigh. Ideas?

More soon! —Becky

New books! Reply

These are so much FUN! My bookshelf had a void, now glowing with these:

  • The Edwardian Modiste, Frances Grimble. 85 Authentic Patterns with Instructions, Fashion Plates, and Period Sewing Techniques.
  • 1920’s Fashions from B. Altman & Company. Dover Publications.
  • Everyday Fashions 1909-1920, As Pictured in Sears Catalogs, Edited by JoAnne Olian. Dover Publications.
  • Everyday Fashions of the Twenties, As Pictured in Sears and Other Catalogs, Edited by Stella Blum.

I LOVE the “house dresses” and have all my fingers crossed that I get some patterns for these! They have really clever cutting lines, are practical and even flattering! The size proportions from the Modiste are a Stitch! Bust 32″, waist 22″, hip 39 1/2″. The idealized 40″ bust figure would fill out with a 30″ waist AND 57″ hip. Okay, I know they wore corsets, but what a change from today!

Those fitting rulers in the Modiste are a mystery! It’ll take some brain-bending (or at least reading the book) to figure those out…

Still waiting to receive my first patterns from the Vintage Pattern Lending Library 1912 Titanic Sewing Project…;-)